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Splynter
Splynter's picture
OK...another question for anyone to chime in on : )

How have you handled a rejection notice? I got my first one today : ( Myself, I'm fine with it. Can't expect to "Ace" your first attempt now can you? That would be a tad silly wouldn't it? Besides, the letter I recieved made it very clear that at least the time was taken to read what I had sent, though it "didn't fit their particular niche". That's cool. I'm OK with that. And all in all, I got a positive review. So, I'm taking that as a small positive wrapped in a slightly larger negative with a pretty bow! LOL

How about you other would be writers ( or the "not-so-would-be-writers"......Jack? LOL ) How did you deal with "bad" news?

Thanks all!

Back to the new book!
John

admin
My Shady Past

I'm sure Jack will chime in, but I'd say anything other than a form letter with "NO" checked means you're doing well. I would not expect many more to be that way. I ran a small publisher in college and the founder had drawn up rejection notices on postcards. "Unfortunately" (we can't use your manuscript) was a daguerrotype of an old West hanging over a corral entrance, while "Regrettably" was another aged looking photography of a cowboy in a great coat standing over a grave...

Splynter
Splynter's picture
re: My Shady Past

LOL. Nothing like that came my way thankfully! : ) As I said above, the fact that there was nothing....I guess "blunt" would be the appropriate word, about my rejection makes the whole thing a positve for me. Like I was told by some-one close to me ( a supporter in my attempts ), "it's better than being flat out ignored, shredded or laughed at." And that's the way I look at it too. Hopefully you're right and there won't be too many more. Fingers crossed! When I'm not typing that is! : )
Thanks for the words!
John

andersm
andersm's picture
Handling Rejection

I haven't yet submitted a manuscript so I have no experience of that type of rejection but I certainly had enough when I was trying to secure permanent employment in my last year of engineering school. I, along with my classmates, took to hanging these 'FOAD' letters around our study cubicles as a way to ease the sting of getting turned down. So, make sure you hold onto your own rejection slips so that you can one day laugh at how many foolish publishers lost the opportunity to have your book under their logo.

It's an amazing accomplishment to even write a book and when it hits print, make sure you let us know. We'll raise a glass of cheer right along side you.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Here's hoping

Thank you very much! And should that day come....you bet I'll let you know! : ) Nothing would be cooler than walking into a Chapters and seeing your own name on the spine of a book!

andersm
andersm's picture
Your book

Have you provided a synopsis of your story here before? If so, point me to it. If not, would you give one? Just a broad overview - the one you visualize on the back of the dust jacket or the inside flaps.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Hmmm....overview?

Nope. Haven't written one here. But, since you asked..............here we go LOL Oh, I'm just "winging" this by the way! : )

My story takes place in a period of time of which Mr. Whyte is familiar. And place. Must be a proud Scottish thing! My family is from the outskirts of Glasgow in lovely Pollock! Scots just seem to wallow in their history! LOL

Anyways, in a nutshell, my tale takes place in the winter of 1306-spring of 1307, Scotland. After Robert the Bruce was crowned King ( the first time ) circumstances sent him running for his life. A fair bit about his life is known prior to this time. And more-so after his return from "exile". My tale is about that period between. Where he was a fugitive. So little is known, no-one can say for sure where he even went while on the run from Edward Plantagenet and all the members of the "non Bruce" factions hunting him. Though in my tale I do have "the cave" of legend ( which I have no doubt is true....but where? ), I left out the mythical spider episode. My story's timeline begins while he is on the run and finds his cave and closes at the point where he makes his first "real" military statement at Loudon Hill against an English army. So, that's it! LOL A very small, extremely difficult, spiritually and emotionally costly, and no doubt defining moment in the life of a man who would return to claim Kingship. And in doing so, become legendary.

Aren't you glad you asked? LOL! Thanks for the interest!
John

andersm
andersm's picture
Yes, I'm glad I asked

Thanks, John, nice summary. It's a book I would read because the subject matter interests me. And yes, the Scots are very proud of their history and rightly so. Many non-Scots are also interested in Scotland's past. It's a land of big people playing out big historical events - highly engaging. My own ancestry also includes a trace of Scottish blood from an expatriate Scot who fought as a mercenary in Poland in the mid-17th century.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Ahh...the heritage : )

Thank you for the compliment! And yes, we are proud. Stupidly so....at times LOL

The only issue I think my "book" would have as far as non Scots goes is that a few characters in the tale ( fictional ones ) speak "Scots". Akin to a modern Glaswegian manner. This tool was utilized strictly to be a clear "dividing line' between the common man in my tale and the "Lordly" types who would have spent a great deal of time south of the border, emulating the speech of the so-called, cultured English court. I reined myself in with the slang etc. but the conversational, I kept. But, it's not too hard to decipher. I hope! LOL

As far as ancestry goes, one of mine actually fought along side William Wallace at Sterling Bridge....among other places : ) He was in fact, Wallaces main man! My aunt ( who still resides in Pollock ) did the whole "trace your lineage thing" and came up with Sir John. Now THAT was cool! Not only being hooked on a certain period of time personally, but to find out that you actually come from one of the major players in a country's epic, defining periods is awesome! Yup! Proud works! LOL

andersm
andersm's picture
Speaking Scots

You were right to have certain characters speak in Scots - language is a powerful identifier not only of nationality but of social class. It immediately shows the reader something important about a character that you don't need to spend a lot of time revealing in lengthy exposition. It also helps quickly identify the speaker in rapid fire dialogue when you need to speed up the pace to add tension. As a non-Scot (well, almost) I can say I have no trouble reading Scots vernacular and even the use of slang, modern or no, adds authenticity as long as used in moderation.

That's pretty exciting to know you have an ancestor who fought beside Wallace. Wouldn't you just love to find an old diary this person kept? I have an ancestor who rode with the Polish King when he lifted the siege of Vienna from the Ottoman Turks in 1683. He was part of the largest cavalry charge in history and though he survived Vienna, he was killed in a battle a month later chasing the Turks across Hungary.

I've read quite a bit about Scottish history just out of general interest. It's surprising how many historical novels somehow touch Scotland - the Scots were everywhere! Did you know that in the 16th - 17th centuries Scotland had many men fighting in foreign wars? At one point it was one in every five adult men. They were outstanding soldiers - highly sought after as mercenaries. One foreign commander said they were men who could appreciate danger but they were never fearful. At Waterloo the piper for the Gordon Highlanders was wounded in both feet and couldn't walk but this doughty man sat and played the pipes to urge the others on. He was awarded a Victoria Cross.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
The Lingo : )

It's the household language so....there's no escaping it: ) And to tell you the truth, I love writing it! It's fun for me and the funny thing is, I used to write out my Dad's birthday cards etc. in the "native" tongue and he was always amazed that I kept it up after all these years, being so far removed and for so long. And I still do it. Sometimes just to confuse people who have no understanding. Then I go full tilt with the slang and all. LOL

Yup, it's cool well you can actually point to a time and a person in a pivotal moment in history and declare, "See him? That's my...........whatever!" That is a really neat feeling to know that you are linked, by blood, to something of significance. Be it large or small on the global scale. In a way....you were there. That's awesome! I have recently found out that I am also linked to a Templar ( Scottish ) that was part of The Lionhearts unsuccessful attempt at reclaiming the Holy Land. That particular ancestor made it home and is buried at the necropolis just outside of the Glasgow Cathedral. The really interesting thing about that, is that 20+ years ago, while drifting about through the beautiful, peaceful grounds of the necropolis, just absorbing the history that is almost a physical thing there-spiritually I mean, ( strange calling a "graveyard" beautiful and peaceful, but it is! ) I stood looking at one particular marker for ages. There was just something about it that drew me. Flash ahead 20+ years, I found out, that's where my ancestor lay. Weird huh?

It's nice to know you have that kind of thing to look on with pride as well. Far too many people forget, bury, what was and that to me is sad. I'm incredibly proud of my heritage and I wear it every day.

As far as the wide spread effect of the Scots, I know that first hand. Just stepping back, say 3-4 generations....my family were everywhere. And most were fighting men. The legendary fearlessness of the Scots ( in particular the Highlanders ) made them almost the battlefield version of the "boogeymen" for centuries. That and their stubborn nature went a long way towards galvanizing a repution that was both admired and greatly feared. LOL And the stubborn aspect? Definitely genetic! LOL

Stubborn and fearless like the under-manned, relatively ill equipped army of Robert the Bruce at the Battle of Bannockburn when the Scots knelt for prayer before engaging the English. Edward the II said something along the lines of "You see? They bow down to beg my forgiveness!" To which ( I can't recall who at this moment, one of his high ranking though ) sitting a charger beside him said, "No my Lord. It is not your forgiveness they pray for. To a man, these shall fight and die where they stand" Something like that anyways LOL

Yup stubborn and formidable : )

andersm
andersm's picture
What we owe

*L* We keep stretching out this thread so every message gets longer and thinner.

I imagine it was a transcendent experience to stand in a graveyard where a Templar knight was buried, especially to recall that feeling years later and have it amplified when you learned the entombed Templar is related to you. That depth of history is absent in Canada - especially here in western Canada. Europe measures it's history in millennia - we measure it in centuries, sometimes only in decades.

We owe a debt of gratitude to historians and historical fiction writers for keeping these people alive and continuing to dwell among us. I wonder if your Templar ancestor ever idly wondered if he might leave some legacy? Well, so he has because you are talking of him here and if he knew, he'd be rightly pleased that you've hung onto him.

Writing and speaking 'in the lingo'...those words and slang do seem to hang on even with the passage of time. My parents were first generation Norwegian and Polish/German/French and they didn't speak English until they started school. Even though they insisted we only use English, odd words crept into our vocabulary. I recall many instances of talking to school friends and getting a cross-eyed look because I'd just used a foreign word completely meaningless to them. Funny now, not so much back then.

RE: the fearlessness of the Scots - it was the Highlanders the foreign commander was speaking about - I should have specified that. I have a good friend who is a Highlander and he makes darn sure that distinction is clear. With his personality I can easily visualize him exuberantly tearing through the heather with broadsword in hand. :-)

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Cathy
Cathy's picture
Skinny posts

"*L* We keep stretching out this thread so every message gets longer and thinner."

That's because you're hitting the reply button on a particular post. Any reply will show up narrower than the post that's being replied to.

If you want the posts to stay wide, scroll down to the bottom of the thread, and just start posting your reply without clicking on a reply button.

I think it would be better to have a board without reply buttons on individual posts. Quote buttons are a much better alternative.

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Thanks for the info!

Thanks for that Cathy! And will do. Oops sorry.....blonde! : P

admin
e.e.cummings famous poem The

e.e.cummings famous poem The Wasteland was circulated to 35 publishers some 20 years after it was first published and made it's initial splash. All 35 of them turned it down.

Splynter
Splynter's picture
That's crazy!

Guess there is hope for me! : ) Just proves Mr. Whytes' point about agents etc. not always being the most literate people in the world. Unfortunately, there is no way around them save self publishing.

Chief Scott
A writer must be prepared for rejection

I have a few rejections so far. Not totally unexpected of course. My critique partner of many years went through about 80 agents in her search before landing one from her "A" list. Unfortunately, the book that landed her an agent didn't sell, so how's THAT for rejection? On the plus side, her first published book went on sale last week, "The Sister Queens" by Sophie Perinot. I bought my copy on the first day it showed up in B&N and took a picture of it on the shelf to send her. Hopefully her debut novel will do well enough to let that first book see the shelf someday.

Splynter
Splynter's picture
: )

Here's hoping your friend meets with success! To just get to that point must be a rush!

As far as the "rejection" goes, I didn't expect anything else. It would be foolish to anticipate anything else....realistically. BUT, I think you hold that little, tiny, flicker, that the first person who sees what you've done, is blown away by it. LOL A dream? Perhaps. But I was pleased with the simple fact that what I wrote was in fact read and assessed. My tale was deemed to not fit within the "areas of expertise" ( their phrase...not mine : ) of this particular agency. It was not ripped apart in regards to substance or style. Nor was it simply cast off as trash. That alone, win or lose, means an awful lot. From what I have been told by others over the last few months who have played this game...or tried....most are ignored and some are even dealt with in such a derogatory fashion for their honest attempts at story telling that they give up entirely. I see it as being turned down nicely was a coup in itself. So, I'm happy. I'll find my door. It's just a matter of knocking on the right one! : )

andersm
andersm's picture
@Cathy

Flagging a reply to a specific person in the subject header also works as would your suggestion of using a quote versus a reply that progressively indents. It's a matter of establishing a protocol everyone understands.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
2 andersm

But where's the fun in that? Let's be rebels and see if we can get the posts down to the width of a single three letter word. It would be like reading the ribbons of the old tele-type machines when I first got into the printing business, oh, so many years ago. Nah! Bad flashback! Forget it! : )

andersm
andersm's picture
three letter words

*L* we can give it a go - or not. I'm a little handicapped reading vertically - not having the experience of working in a print shop.

Question: did you always plan to be a writer one day or did the notion come on you suddenly?

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
re: three letter words

Believe me, the novelty of reading those things wears off pretty darn quick. Especially if it's a big news day and the wire services are all a-buzz. Miles and miles of ribbon all over the place! : )

As far as the writing goes? Hmmmm, did I ever want to be? Honestly, I don't think so. But I did enjoy doing it. My Dad was an amazing story teller. Most of what he told was spur of the moment, off the cuff and never made it to paper...for the most part. He would keep the kids captivated with his huge, fantastic tales. I would like to think I got some of that from him. Though, admittedly, my first forays into story telling were alibis and excuses! LOL Seriously though, my baby sister pushed and shoved until I enlisted in a competition. The deadlines etc. got me over my dread of typing ( I'm still lousy at it, just a whole bunch faster! : ) and I just went from there. It was a lot easier than I thought it would be. In no time at all, it became so enjoyable to sit and spin as it were, the experience changed my outlook and I began chasing the idea of being "A writer." So much so. I'm working on a sci-fi novel and a Templar tale right now. Unlike before, I now have the courage to put them down. All thanks to a kid sister who thinks I've got stuff well worth getting out and sharing with others. : )

The other thing that made me WANT to chase that dream was when I got over my initial fear of letting other people read my finished manuscript. The response I got helped a great deal. It is a really nice feeling when people "buy" into your tale to such a degree you are being asked to do a second book to continue the story. Maybe even a series according to some! LOL
.

andersm
andersm's picture
John - kudos to your baby sister

When your own family thinks you have talent, then you really must. Usually siblings are a bit more skeptical one of the brood has what it takes, being as they remember you as a snot-nosed kid. On the other hand, baby sisters are typically more respectful of older brothers.

BTW, where did you find your alpha and beta readers?

Marlene

PS: feel free to contact me on my personal e-mail at andersm0@telus.net unless you don't mind conversing here.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Re: Readers

Anything creative judged by family can be a hit or miss situation I think. Some may be too soft in their assessment in hopes of sparing your feelings. Others may rip you apart for the simple fact you've "created" something that they may not be able to themselves. For whatever reason. I find family when it comes to artistic or creative endeavours can be a great support fraught with perils.

As far as the readers go, there were a few criteria that were important to me.
1. Avid book readers. Just like you wouldn't want somebody who finds reality TV to be the pinnacle of entertainment to be a movie critic.LOL
2. An interest in history and historical fiction. Everyone has a bias in subject matter and if they can't allow themselves to "slip" back in time to delve into a tale, you're wasting your time. I found that out with my sci-fi project. It's such, I guess, a well defined niche, some cannot get into it. No matter how good the weave. : ) My early chapters were well recieved as a tale, but because it takes place "out there", it's instantly a barrier for some.
3. To me, the most important. Honesty. Those who read what I wrote were allowed to based on the above but more so on the simple fact that no punches would be pulled in their assessment. That was what I wanted and a couple of times, I got bruised! LOL And that was fine. That is exactly what I was hoping for and the funny thing is, more often than not, I would write a chapter or scene and on occassion have something I wasn't entirely happy with. I might find it was lacking or somehow flat and hand it off anyways to see if what I read in my own work was picked up by others. Every single time I had issue with a scene, a character, an exchange, whatever, invariably some-one else did too...without my input before they read it! I would just sit back quietly and await the response. Almost without fail I was treated to my own views coming back at me from some-one else!

So, there you go Marlene. I found my readers for my work in progress based on those 3 points. #3 was the most important to me, but the other two were right up there as well. So much so, I think, if it was possible, they would all be #1. IF this particular tale makes it to print...there most certainly will be names in there in dedication. Those will be the names of the pushers, shovers, supporters and those who had the rights, the guts and the honesty, to throw the punches when I needed them.

John

PS.email sounds fine by the way. Just thought I'd grab more points first! LOL

Tyner
Rejection is Progress

Splynter,

I've always viewed a rejection letter as a badge of honour. Think of all the people who tool around saying, "One day, I'll write a book," but never actually get off their asses and do it.

A rejection letter is a sign that you're working, writing, and trying, which is the most important thing in the writing life. If you're not getting rejected then you're not really working at it.

I collected a large stack of rejection letters/emails before I found a publisher who wanted to work with my book, so I would not be at all discouraged by one rejection letter. I say, wear it like the badge of honour it is.

Tyner

Splynter
Splynter's picture
re:Progress

Hey Tyner!
I agree completely! I've got no issues with the whole rejection thing. If you're going to put something out there.....it's got to happen. So I'm cool! And yes, you're right too in the fact that I actually did do what I set out to do. I take pride in that alone. Rejection or not. I was just curious as to how others who may have tried, dealt with it. As I said, I'm cool with it. I've written two complete ( shopping one, editing the other ) and I am well on my way on two others at this moment. My time will come, I'm not worried about that.

I just hope I don't get too many more "no's"! LOL

John

andersm
andersm's picture
Sci Fi

Here it is nearly 4 pm PDT and I started this note this morning. One of those days where one phone call turns the apple cart over.

Sci Fi is definitely a unique field. My husband is a voracious consumer . Now that I think about it, his reading preference is future focused while mine is in historical events of the past. Hmmm...I should do some thinking about that. I do read some sci fi - is there a better Sci Fi book than William Gibson's Neuromancer? Written in 1984 and the language of computers today came from that book. The term 'cyberspace' came straight from the pages of Neuromancer. It all comes back to me...Molly the Razor girl with the implanted chips in her brain and the razor-sharp switch-blades she could pop out of her fingers. That was a brilliant piece of work for the sheer creativity of describing a world that didn't exist back in 1984 but is commonplace today.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Sci-Fi

Seeing as how everybody has a favourite, for whatever reason.......mine will always be "The Time Machine". My Dad introduced me to the classics with a box set for Christmas in 1972 and because of that and that alone....two books in that particular genre stand head and shoulders above all others for me. The Time Machine as mentioned and 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. They got me hooked at an early age on the classics. And they still got me. To the point where I am considering fleshing out a story out line I drafted that takes place 50 years after Jim Hawkin climbed aboard the Hispaniola on the quest to find Treasure Island. AND writing it in the same style as Robert Louis Stevenson for continuity's sake. LOL Love 'em!!

andersm
andersm's picture
The Time Machine

Dare I even say it? I haven't read The Time Machine.

I wonder if there isn't a story in the treasure supposedly buried on Oak Island. I read a book several months ago that speculated the Templars landed in Nova Scotia and their treasure was buried there. It would be a continuation of William Sinclair's story after Order in Chaos.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
?

Never read The Time Machine? The birth of sci-fi? Oh man! LOL

Sure there is treasure there. I have no doubt. Templar? Possible. They "supposedly" found a Templar medallion in Maryland I believe not too long ago. They have authenticated it but cannot thus far conclude when it got to where it was found. A 1000 years is a long time span in which somebody could have dropped it on a walk : ) But I truly believe they were here. After the fateful Friday the 13th, they had to go somewhere and with their seafaring knowledge. skills and sheer guts, I have my doubts that they all went in the same or similar direction. Scotland or otherwise. In most aspects, that organisation was centuries ahead of everybody else. No, they were here a few hundred years before Columbus. I'd bet on that. That and the simple fact that the legendary treasure of the Templars completely and utterly disappeared. It had to go somewhere and where better than a place that at the time, did not exist?

andersm
andersm's picture
Of Time Machines and Templars

I know - mea culpa. I can't believe I openly confessed I haven't read The Time Machine. I might get kicked out of Canada. :-(

Born in Blood - Among the top ten of non-fiction books I've read, second only to Bloodlands. The author makes a convincing case the Templars live on in the Freemasons and that the peasant revolt in England in the 1380s had the fugitive Templars behind it. It has little nuggets of interesting information scattered throughout - such as what is meant by getting 'the third degree'. ...and the origin of the word rigamarole.

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Kicked out?

Na, I don't think you should get kicked out. Poked with a sharp stick next time you're in a book store, to direct you to a copy. Maybe LOL

Sure, the Templars are still here. They never left no matter what those silly TV shows and all that other media rubbish may spout. An organization such as them, so entrenched, widespread, secretive, wealthy, powerful and plain smart, could not possibly be halted, abolished or eradicated. No chance. They slipped into the shadows and have remained there. I believe the Freemasons are part of that. A branch of the same "company". I come from a very, very long line of Masons, my Father was one. As was his Father. And his Father and so on. ( I am not one ) And I have absolutely no doubt that the Templars are as active today as they were in the 1200's. They just don't wear the surcoats : ) I think it's a silly to assume they are dead and gone. Even if you go strictly by the armoured Templars of legend, for every one of those highly visible individuals, there were a minimum of ten unremarkable men behind him. Granted, those ten were not "true" Templars as we know them to be. The titled, wealthy sons of the upper eschelons of society of the day etc. etc. but how do you remove all those "unknowns" behind them that could step forward to fill the void when things were bad? Indoctrination protocols may have change to allow full membership when they were hit hard. Who knows? The Templars certainly never told. Nor did they vanish.

andersm
andersm's picture
Where did they go?

I like to think someone knows with certainty the details of the evaporating Templars. Unsolved mysteries drive me crazy. The loss of the Holy Land eradicated their public reason for existence but what about those unspoken reasons they came into being? There seems to be an awful lot of effort made to discredit them and that in itself gives pause for thought. Who's behind all the fuss against the masons?

Marlene
"How you do anything is how you do everything."

Splynter
Splynter's picture
Where oh where?

Here is my theory....in part. : )

Someone knows. Many know. Everything. Past and present. That I am sure of. Because they didn't go anywhere. I'll bet that there are thousands and thousands ( probably hundreds of thousands ) within the order who are not even aware they are. They have not earned and 99.9% never will earn the right to know. That 99.9% follow a belief system, a doctrine every single day for one thing. Yet it really is another. It is so many steps removed, in so many convoluted directions, they have no clue. And never will. No matter how hard they may look, they'll never see it. They're not meant to.

As far as the discreditting of the Templars go, they were birthed, organised and run by very, very smart men. Men who knew how to manipulate, conceal and amass huge amounts of power and wealth while presenting a certain public image, even if the members of the order did a fine job themselves in later years of tarnishing that image. Having said that, I would not be the least bit surprised that the Order itself is one of the major mudslingers. And always has been. Right from the second things started to turn back on them. People in general suffer from linear thought proccesses and it is very, very easy to change the direction of the straight line they follow. That, is what the Templars have done and are doing from my view point. If you gently nudge someone off into a slightly different direction, then again and again and again. And keep doing so. You will essentially and effectively remove their memory of their own starting point. Especially if you have disguised and muddled everything ahead and behind. It's even more effective now with the help of things such as the ever foolish modern media grasping at anything they see as sensational or provocative for a quick buck and the internet spreading the muck world wide at the speed of light. That's what I think the Templar have done. All the other orders that people tend to look at with a sneer and contempt are all a part of the smoke screen. Deflection of attention. Slight of hand on a grand scale. Muddying of the waters. It all works amazingly well when people jump up, shout and point a finger. All it takes is one to start. Then everybody else jumps on board and does the same. After-all, you can only point your finger in one direction at any one time. What about the other 359 degrees?

Splynter
Splynter's picture
A whole new game?

Well, bit the bullet and did it! Sent out the query and sample chapters for another tale. A different genre and MAYBE, just maybe an easier sell because of it. Not that it was written for that purpose mind you. I just had fun as this was actually my first full on attempt at a manuscript of novel length. Well, it's out there now, flying through the data stream at the speed of light to agents near and far! Fingers crossed and abs tensed in anticipation of a gut punch or two ( or a dozen : )....a.k.a....rejection. Oh well, ya gots to do whats ya gots to do if ya wanna do whatcha wanna do. Or somethng like that! LOL
John

Surrey Writers

The International Surrey Writers Conference is coming up October 24-26, 2014 in Surrey, BC, Canada. Last year, members of the Forum here lead by user andersm presented to Jack the items pictured including a leather bound collection of stories from readers about Jack and his work.

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On the eve of the vote for Scottish independence, Gobal Okanagan TV caught up with Jack on his home golf course.

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